Only a few days left to qualify for the “Best things I learned at the PASS summit” competition

I’m really looking forward to the upcoming PASS summit in Seattle. I know it’s a tough year for funds and training, etc. but (particularly for those that travel from a distance), this is likely to be the year offering the lowest cost travel options for a very, very long time. It’s a tough year in the airline business too.

One of my colleagues Pinal Dave has just described why he thinks you should attend: http://blog.sqlauthority.com/2009/06/19/sql-server-why-you-should-attend-pass-summit-unite-2009-seattle/

But the other interesting part is that you can win an awesome lot of prizes, including one prize of accommodation at the summit by simply describing the best thing you have learned at a PASS summit. Bill Graziano provided a great example of this and details of the competition here: http://weblogs.sqlteam.com/billg/archive/2009/06/04/What-did-you-learn-at-PASS.aspx.

But you will have to hurry as it ends soon.

Writing code with speech recognition

Speech recognition technology has intrigued me for years but never seemed to live up to its promise. It always seemed to me to have more potential where a very limited grammar was involved, rather than attempting complex work like writing freeform prose. For example, the number of commands you can give to a television set is quite limited and much more likely to be successful.

Writing code in programming languages also seems to fit this quite well as it has a constrained grammar. I’ve often wondered what on earth I’d do if I couldn’t type for some reason and figured that speech recognition might provide the answer (while hoping not to be in that situation in the first place).

I was impressed today to see a video from the folk at Renaissance in Israel (including fellow RD Jackie Goldstein) who have tried to tackle the use of speech recognition within Visual Studio. It’s a work in progress but definitely worth a look:

http://www.renaissance.co.il/VSSpeech.aspx

 

SQL Server 2008 Full Text Indexing – Working out how many documents still need to be processed

I had a query from an attendee of my full-text indexing session at TechEd US. He asked how he can find out which documents (or how many) still need to be processed. I did a little investigation on this and here’s my best guess:

<WARNING: Undocumented and potentially just a guess!>

1. Query for the objectid of your full-text index. You can do this by:

select * from sys.fulltext_indexes

2. Open an admin connection to your system ie: connect to admin:SERVER instead of SERVER.

3. Query as follows:

select * from sys.fulltext_index_docidstatus_2105058535

(the number on the end needs to be your full text index’s object id not mine :-))

From what I can see, this table seems to hold details of documents not yet processed and it gets cleaned up as documents are processed. This is an internal table that you can see via:

select * from sys.internal_tables

</WARNING: Undocumented and potentially just a guess!>

Hope that helps someone.