Jacob Sebastian is a writing machine: free eBook on XML Schemas in SQL Server

One of the members of our Asian regional development team for PASS is Jacob Sebastian. A week or so back he told me he'd written an eBook for the Red-Gate folk on XML Schemas in SQL Server. I downloaded it expecting it to be fifty to a hundred pages. It was 483 pages. What can I say: Jacob is a writing machine. You can download it here:

http://beyondrelational.com/blogs/jacob/archive/2009/04/26/my-latest-book-the-art-of-xsd-sql-server-xml-schema-collections-available-for-free-download.aspx

Farewell Steve and thanks for all the fish

Microsoft lost a lot of good people this week. I have to say this change has me dumbfounded. Steve has become a friend over many years of presenting at the same events. I've usually found him to be one of the most interesting people at any of these events. He's also usually the one of top presenters (if not the top) at most of these events.

Good luck Steve.

Why don't the headlines say "Developer glitch" or "Design glitch" instead of "Database glitch"

Most people are aware that a "database" glitch caused the download servers for Windows 7 RC to fail the other day. What annoys me though is that the headlines always say "Database glitch" or "SQL Server glitch". Based on what Paul Randall was posting today, it seems like a pretty simple "Design glitch" or a "Developer glitch".

Every month, I find myself at sites with issues caused by the lack of database-related skills in developer teams. SQL Server does such a good job and is so easy to work with that it seems like many developer teams think they don't need database-related skills, particularly at the design stage. How can that message get changed? Or is that a lost cause and the product needs to simply become:

  • even easier to use or
  • more accomodating of design issues or
  • clearly identify design issues?

Perhaps the headlines should say "Project Management Glitch".