Finally – a good VB to VB.NET converter

It was great to see an announcement from Francesco Ballena today that his VB to VB.net conversion tool has finally hit the market. It’s at www.vbmigration.com and looks like the sort of tool that was needed when VB.NET was first released. It sure would have avoided a lot of angst in the community. I was particularly impressed by the quote at http://www.vbmigration.com/Blog/default.aspx. I’d have to say I could definitely relate to the sentiment expressed in it. Congratulations Francesco!

After 15 years of developing our application in VB3, VB4-16 bit and VB6, I was disappointed to discover that we could not move to VB.Net. Our application was too large to rewrite into the new syntax. In spite of edits made to follow the new rules, such as omitting the lower bound on Dim statements, the migration tool available ran for 5 hours and gave 1947 errors to fix; and that was just on our main application program. Using VB Migration Partner, we converted that same code to .Net in 9 minutes and had 3 compilation errors to fix, all having to do with a third-party OCX. After commenting out those lines, the application started up and ran just fine, displaying dialogs that invoke our VB6 COM servers to perform calculations and print reports. Amazing! We need to keep developing our code in VB6 for our current clients, but the batch processing and code-test-fix methodology will allow us to convert a changing code base without making the same changes twice, once in VB6 and again in VB.Net.

New Geek Toy and Upcoming SQL Down Under Podcasts

Hi Folks,

I was so pleased today to finally get my new geek “toy” installed. I bought a Rode Podcaster mike a while back but didn’t get a chance to install it till today. I love the balanced arm that lets me get it positioned so well while still able to type. And then I can just push it out of the way. It’s a broadcast quality mike and is in a shock mount. I’ve already noticed a major difference in the sound quality, including vastly reduced background noise. I’ve got a pop-filter for it which I might end up using too.

 

I had a small problem getting it working with Vista but was super-impressed that I just called their phone number, within one transfer I got to a human who immediately helped me. I have to mention it because that’s so far removed from the typical service experience I have with most things nowadays.

So look out for increased sound quality on upcoming SQL Down Under podcasts. I’d taken a break from producing any for a while as I’ve been travelling extensively but now I’m back and they’ll start to flow.